The Easiest 2-Ingredient DIY Face Mask to Brighten Skin and Fight Redness in Minutes

October 13, 2016
by Jill Russell for Thrive Market

Sometimes the best facial treatments come from your very own kitchen. Consider turmeric—an anti-inflammatory spice we’ve been known to put in both tea lattes and DIY beauty recipes.

Spirulina, a type of nutrient-packed algae available in capsule and powder form, falls into that same category. It has a seemingly unending parade of uses, and gives a brilliant green hue to everything from risotto to tapenade. Plus, one serving delivers a healthy dose of antioxidants, inflammation-fighting essential fatty acids, manganese, B-vitamins, zinc, and iron. Translation: like turmeric, it’s really good for you as part of a healthy diet, and it's really good your skin.

Here’s how to harness spirulina’s power in the easiest make-at-home face mask to fight redness and signs of aging, and detox your complexion in minutes. Throw in honey, which has hydrating, healing, and antibacterial properties, and you have one really effective concoction made with just two simple (and edible!) ingredients.

Use it once or twice a week after washing your face for brighter, clearer, softer skin—no spa required.

Brightening Spirulina and Honey Mask

What You Need

3 tablespoons spirulina powder
3 tablespoons organic honey
Optional: cucumber slices, for eyes

Instructions

Whisk ingredients together in a small bowl until combined. The mixture will have a paste-like consistency.

Smooth all over clean face and wait 20 minutes. For the full spa experience, lie back, close your eyes, and place cucumber slices over your eyelids.

After 20 minutes, gently remove with a damp washcloth, and rinse with water. Follow up with your favorite moisturizer or facial oil.

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This article is related to: Beauty, DIY skincare, Healthy Skin, Video, DIY Face Mask

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