Eating for Good Vibes: Fact or Fiction?

August 12, 2015
by Michelle Pellizzon for Thrive Market
Eating for Good Vibes: Fact or Fiction?

Ever had a healthy meal that left you buzzing  with energy? Maybe you're just operating on some good vibrations.

From macrobiotics to Ayurvedic eating principles, dietary theories from around the world hold the belief that the food we eat impacts the balance of our energy in some way. Scientifically we know that feeding your body nutrient-dense foods is energizing because you’re fueling your cells. So it’s not so crazy to think that the types of food we ingest affects our mood and energy, right?

Those who advocate vibrational eating believe that our bodies work at an optimal vibration, and that every food has energy and nutritional value that affects the whole body’s vibration. The healthier the body, the higher the vibrational frequency.

So what affects your body’s frequency levels? Negativity, for one. If you’re depressed, stuck in a job you hate, or surrounded by toxic people, chances are the vibrational energy surrounding you is low. The same goes for foods that have been processed or are lacking in nutrients. By processing foods in a factory, you’re killing the good vibes and nutrients that plants and animals naturally contain, and squashing their frequency levels. Combine negative energy with low-frequency foods, and your body is working at a seriously low vibration.

Get those good vibes going by eating foods that have a higher vibrational field. The closer the food is to its natural form the more likely it is to have a higher frequency, proponents of vibrational eating claim. Fresh organic fruits and vegetables, filtered water, sea vegetables, raw nuts, raw oils, raw organic dairy products, and raw honey are all fantastic choices for those trying increase their positive vibrations.

Whether you subscribe to the idea of vibrational energy or not, there’s no denying that these foods will certainly make you feel better than processed junk food can. Studies show that boiling and overcooking fruits and veggies can decrease their nutritional load, and if you’re slathering chili cheese on top of your sweet potato you’re probably not going to feel as vibrant and energized as you would if you eat it with a bit of grass-fed butter and sea salt.

Increased energy can lead to a better mood—and a big smile on your face is a sure sign of good vibrations, which just might give onlookers excitations.

Photo credit: Oriana Koren

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This article is related to: Ayurveda, Energy, Healthy Eating, Positivity, Eating habits, Ayurvedic medicine

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