The Amazing Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

July 12, 2016
by Thrive Market
The Amazing Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

What if there was an organic elixir that could promote healthy digestion, clean your house and cleanse your hair and skin? Well, there is such a thing. It’s called apple cider vinegar.

Also known as ACV, this fermented liquid is loaded with friendly bacteria, which is what has made it such an obsession within the natural health community for years.

What is apple cider vinegar?

ACV is a vinegar made by crushing apples, squeezing out the liquid, and adding yeast in order to ferment its sugars. The liquid is converted into alcohol, to which bacteria is then added. As it’s allowed to ferment more, it develops acetic acid, which is the main compound and active ingredient in apple cider vinegar.

The result of this fermentation process is a light brown, murky liquid. It differs from distilled white vinegar mainly because it contains the “mother,” a cloudy sediment seen within the bottle, which boasts small amounts of proteins, enzymes, amino acids, and fiber—particularly pectin from the apples—as well as plenty of “good” bacteria, giving raw ACV tons of probiotic power. The best-quality ACV is organic, raw, undistilled, and unfiltered.

This is What Apple Cider Vinegar Looks Like

Acetic acid makes ACV special

Despite some claims, ACV hasn’t been found to contain high levels of nutrients and minerals. (However, some believe it may contain phytochemicals, which exist in plants to help them endure environmental stress.) But, one thing ACV is high in: acetic acid.

Acetic acid is naturally antimicrobial, which means it can kill bacteria and pathogens. This is what gives ACV such power to clean and disinfect—and why it's sometimes incorporated in DIY home remedies for:

  • Nail fungus
  • Lice
  • Warts
  • Ear infections

Acetic acid is known to inhibit E.coli, which means ACV makes a great ingredient in preserving and pickling foods such as garlic and cucumbers. But acetic acid has other uses, too.

How ACV can help promote healthy digestion

Enzymes in apple cider vinegar, as well as the fiber from the “mother,” may help the digestive process. Just like other acids, acetic acid can help the body to effectively absorb minerals from food. Scientists also believe that ACV can inhibit the digestion of starch.

“The antiglycemic effect of acetic acid, the active ingredient in vinegar, has been attributed to reduced starch digestion and/or delayed gastric emptying.” —Andrea M. White, PHD and Carol S. Johnston, PHD

The “mother” also contains pectin, which can help promote healthy bowel movements, too.

 

Maple-ACV Tonic

How to use ACV

Be sure to dilute ACV with water or other liquids when drinking. Try this tonic recipe for an energizing elixir that may help you feel great from the inside out.

Cook with it

ACV is also a versatile cooking staple. The punchy, sparkly-sour taste adds brightness to many dishes—especially salad. For the only salad dressing you’ll ever need, simply mix up these ingredients:

Here are some other nourishing and delicious recipes using ACV:

ACV + honey

Mixing apple cider vinegar with honey is believed to make delicious drink that may promote overall wellness when consumed first thing in the morning.

To whip up your own ACV-and-honey tonic, stir 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and 1 teaspoon raw honey into a cup of hot water. Sip it every morning, followed by a few glasses of water.

Thrive Market Organic Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar around the house

Ready to banish bleach and other potentially harmful chemical cleaners from your home? ACV is a great alternative. Make an easy, powerful degreaser by combining equal parts apple cider vinegar and water. Pour into a spray bottle, shake, and spritz. This solution also works as a mildew spray for the shower.

A rich, all-natural wood polish is another great DIY cleaner: Combine ¼ cup ACV with 2 cups water and 2 tablespoons olive oil.

If the pungent scent of ACV has you missing conventional cleaners, no problem! Just add several drops of your favorite essential oil to your liking. For squeaky-clean freshness, we like lemon.

Apple cider vinegar can work wonders in the yard, too, especially as a safe, natural, and eco-friendly weed killer. Here’s the how-to:

  • Mix ½ gallon of ACV with ¼ cup table salt and ½ teaspoon liquid dish soap.
  • Spray the concoction directly onto unwanted weeds. Be careful to use it strictly as a spot treatment since it can kill other plants as well.

On the flip side, ACV can potentially act as a fertilizer to certain plants that love acidic soil, such as blueberry bushes, hydrangeas, and hibiscus. Mix 10 ounces of ACV with 10 gallons of water and pour on soil to help cultivate these plants.

Surprising ways to use ACV in beauty

Guess what? Some of our favorite ways to use ACV involve beauty—and we’re not alone. Its popularity as a beauty staple is growing every day. Here are two foolproof ways to use ACV for amazing hair and skin.

Shampoo with baking soda, rinse with ACV

Famously known as the “no poo” method, this revolutionary hair routine involves “shampooing” hair with baking soda, and conditioning with ACV. The theory is that using this base and acid combo balances the hair's pH. But since baking soda is highly basic, with a pH of 9, it might do more damage than good for the hair. According to Audrey Kunin, MD, author of the book DermaDoctor SkinStruction Manual: The Smart Guide to Healthy, Beautiful Skin and Looking Good at Any Age:

“Alkaline shampoos strip the hair’s natural oils and disrupt the acid mantle, causing dehydration and leading to porous, fragile hair.”

However, an ACV rinse doesn’t seem to pose such risks—in fact, it can help offset that kind of damage. Each strand of hair is protected by a cuticle comprised of tightly woven scales that lay flat against the shaft and reflect light. When the hair’s normally acidic pH balance goes out of whack from a buildup of alkaline hair products, the cuticle comes undone, leaving hair prone to breakage and giving it a frizzy, dull appearance.

The acidity of ACV can rescue hair by restoring pH balance to help repair the cuticle. The result: ultra-shiny hair! Raw, unfiltered ACV also has natural alpha-hydroxy acid that can gently exfoliate the scalp and hair to remove dead skin cells and product buildup, so depending on your hair and scalp, after using it for awhile, you might be able to skip shampoo altogether.

Try this formula for the perfect ACV conditioning hair rinse:

Put ingredients into a spray bottle and shake every time before use. In the shower, spray solution generously onto wet hair, work into scalp and strands, and rinse.

Apple cider vinegar as a toner

Apple cider vinegar’s pH-balancing properties and alpha hydroxy content also gives it major skin benefits. You can use ACV as the base for a DIY pore-cleansing toner that’s so easy to make. Check out the recipe here.

ACV for dogs and cats

Yes, apple cider vinegar can do good for your furry friends, too! Fleas despise the acidic taste of ACV, so try adding a little of this vinegar to your pet's drinking water. For a 40-pound dog, add one teaspoon ACV to one quart of water (adjust according to the animal’s weight). For both dogs and cats, a diluted 1-1 mixture of ACV and water can be sprayed directly onto their fur and skin. (Dilution is especially important for cats, who tend to have more sensitive skin.)

So what did we tell you? ACV really does have amazing benefits all around—and it’ll only cost you $3 at Thrive Market!

Photo credit: Alicia Cho, Paul Delmont

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3 thoughts on “The Amazing Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar”

  • Jill Turner Odice
    Jill Turner Odice January 15, 2016 at 1:56 am

    I drink a cup of hot spring water with a tablespoon of local raw honey and a splash of Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar every morning before eating anything. It has helped tremendously with my aching elbows! Before I started drinking this, I could barely lift anything, open windows etc. I could not sleep because of how bad my elbows were aching. I tried aspirin, Naproxen, MSM with Chondroitin, all kinds of Arthritis meds etc. and non of them really helped with the constant pain. When I went to my health clinic, they just told me it was part of getting old! I am so thankful to have read about the ACV and honey remedy, it is amazing!

    Reply
    • lemurleap

      Do you follow it with "a few glasses of water" as recommended in the article? I don't think I would stick to drinking that much right off the bat in the morning and I exercise within an hour of getting up so I wouldn't want a stomach full of water.

      Reply
      • Jill Turner Odice
        Jill Turner Odice January 20, 2016 at 11:42 am

        No I don't. I have always loved the taste of apple cider vinegar, even drank it as a little kid...I must have known something :-)

        Reply
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