Glee

High fiber and protein gluten free products with a navy bean base. Welcome to the wonderful world of Mrs. Glee's Gluten-Free Foods, especially if you want to increase your fiber and protein intake. Mrs. Glee's foods are great tasting and easy to prepare. To provide the needed fiber and protein, Mrs. Glee's utilizes the navy bean as the base ingredient in all of its products. The Michigan navy bean has long been known to be extremely nutritious,high in fiber, and a great source of protein and has large amounts of trace minerals such as folate, magnesium, copper, manganese, potassium, thiamin, and iron, according to World's Healthiest Foods.Now, with the U.S.D.A. MyPlate, navy beans are listed as both a vegetable and protein source. And, our unique processing technique helps to make the bean flour more easily digestible, reducing or eliminating the adverse affects associated with some bean products. Unlike other bean flours, the Performance Blend has minimal bean flavor. Customers often note a slight aftertaste, but when asked if it’s negative, the answer is no. So try some today! Mrs. Glee's Foods are great tasting, nutritional and great for you.WHY BEANS??Mrs. Glee's uses a unique process to convert the Michigan grown navy bean into a wonderfully nutritious gluten free base ingredient. The process results in a flour that is mild tasting and easy to digest while adding fiber and protein to your diet. Mrs. Glee's products are excellent sources of protein and fiber as well as great tasting and easy to prepare.The articles below provided valuable information on the nutritious benefits of incorporating beans into your diet.Beans: Protein-Rich Superfoods High in fiber and antioxidants, beans aren't just good for the waistline, they may aid in disease prevention, too. By Jenny Stamos Kovacs, WebMD the Magazine - Feature Reviewed by Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD More than just a meat substitute, beans are so nutritious that the latest dietary guidelines recommend we triple our current intake from 1 to 3 cups per week. What makes beans so good for us? Here's what the experts have to say:Chronic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease all have something in common. Being overweightincreases your chances of developing them and makes your prognosis worse if you do, says Mark Brick, PhD -- which means that trimming your waistline does more for you than make your pants look better. Brick, a professor in the department of soil and crop sciences at Colorado State University, is investigating the ability of different bean varieties to prevent cancer and diabetes.Beans are comparable to meat when it comes to calories, says Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, a registered dietitian at Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Wellness Institute in Chicago and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. But they really shine in terms of fiber and water content, two ingredients that make you feel fuller, faster. Adding beans to your diet helps cut calories without feeling deprived.Our diets tend to be seriously skimpy when it comes to fiber (the average American consumes just 15 grams daily), to the detriment of both our hearts and our waistlines. One cup of cooked beans (or two-thirds of a can) provides about 12 grams of fiber -- nearly half the recommended daily dose of 21 to 25 grams per day for adult women (30 to 38 grams for adult men). Meat, on the other hand, contains no fiber at all.This difference in fiber content means that meat is digested fairly quickly, Brick says, whereas beans are digested slowly, keeping you satisfied longer. Plus, beans are low in sugar, which prevents insulin in the bloodstream from spiking and causing hunger. When you substitute beans for meat in your diet, you get the added bonus of a decrease in saturated fat, says Blatner.Still not convinced? In a recent study, bean eaters weighed, on average, 7 pounds less and had slimmer waists than their bean-avoiding counterparts -- yet they consumed 199 calories more per day if they were adults and an incredible 335 calories more if they were teenagers.Beans have something else that meat lacks, Blatner says: phytochemicals, compounds found only in plants (phyto is Greek for "plant"). Beans are high in antioxidants, a class of phytochemicals that incapacitate cell-damaging free radicals in the body, says Brick. (Free radicals have been implicated in everything from cancer and aging to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.)In a U.S. Department of Agriculture study, researchers measured the antioxidant capacities of more than 100 common foods. Three types of beans made the top four: small red beans, red kidney beans, and pinto beans. And three others -- black beans, navy beans, and black-eyed peas -- achieved top-40 status.The bottom line? Beans are pretty much the perfect food, Brick says. See More

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12 packs of 16 pieces each

Retail Price: $15.00


Our Price: $10.95 (Save 27%)

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12 packs of 16 pieces each

Retail Price: $15.00


Our Price: $10.95 (Save 27%)

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